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to the gentlelady from oregon, ms. bonamici. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. bonamici: i rise in support of h.r. 2838 to protect our marine economy, protect our maritime borders and protect the brave coast guard personnel, including the personnel of the sector columbia river which is headquartered in oregon's first congressional district. i thank the coast guard subcommittee for their work on this and the full and ranking member of the full transportation and infrastructure committee. in supporting the basic mission of the coast guard, this bill includes language to re-authorize another important mission carried out, noaa's marine debris program. in june of this year, coastal residents in my home state of oregon found a 66-foot dock resting on a beach near the town of new port, oregon. the dock was just one piece of many that scientists have estimated to be a debris field with as much as 1.5 million tons of debris that were washed into the ocean by the tsunami that struck japan in march of 2011. beyond the obvious navigational dangers post posed by the dock and the -- dan
expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: the mall shooting that might have been worse and ended in newtown, connecticut, where it's impossible to imagine that it was worse. it's part of an ongoing pattern of carnage because we lose one life to gun violence every 20 minutes, every hour, every day. the mass murders reclaiming my time page gets the country's attention, but the same total loss of life at sandy hook happens more than twice every day all year long. this is personal for me, not just because the mall shooter was in my district, but i had a high school friend who was killed with a random freak drive-by shooting, my brother took his life with a handgun as a young man. i supported gun provisions at the state and federal level at every opportunity. it might be different now. not just because the horrific image of parade of funerals for children, i submit mayor bloomberg's advocacy for gun safety and mayors who brare the brunt of the gun violence. i welcome the president's leadership and will support any reform that he
requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? >> madam speaker, i ask unanimous consent to address the chamber for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, i rise today to ask labor secretary hill do solis a simple question on behalf of the farmers of oregon. when will we get answers about the department's heavy-handed enforcement tactics? in august mitigating circumstance colleagues and i from the oregon delegation, republicans and democrats alike, wrote to the secretary about reports that the department of labor had been discarding due process and appeal and using orders to deal with farms in the northwest. mr. walden: we are still waiting for a written response 108 days later. we know the department can move with great speed when it wan -- wants to, when it's trying to shut down a farm with little due process or appeal. so why does it take so long to get answers for oregon farmers? i ask the secretary to clarify in writing the process. no one is arguing for unfair labor practices but our f
.org. >> welcome to "communicators." helping to kick off the series is the former senator of the state of oregon, gordon smith. >> good to be back. >> senator smith, could you start by talking to us about how people watch television in the current day as, say, opposed to a few years ago? >> broadcasting is affected by that. we remain highly relevant because what we do is local, and as to those who want to get it the old-fashioned way, it is free, and yet, you have satellite, you have cable, and now you have the internet, through hulu or netflix, which are other ways to access television, so television remains highly relevant to the future. when you look at the top 100 programs that are watched, 90 of them are broadcast, -- content. i think the future is bright, indeed. -- 90 of them are broadcast content. we are a mobile society, and so the challenge is to make sure that we are on pads, computers, phones, as well as traditional viewing, now with a wonderful high-definition television screen. the other challenge we have is that spectrum is a finite resource, and others want that resource, and the
are trying to deliver. we have a corridor between eugene, oregon, and vancouver, british columbia. we have achieved in the last year up to 880,000 passengers and our growth is increasing year over year. we have invested over former to $80 million in the capital and operations and amtrak cascade which is what we call our program. it was not until the recovery act came that we were able to make significant capital and press structure improvement on the rail itself, pink, double tracking. all those amenities double benefit high and higher speed rail and more frequent service for passenger rail also has ancillary benefits to our freight rail a in our state. we are very trade dependent and one of the things we are careful about in not only updating our passenger rail program and plan for the feature is to look at both freight and passenger rail movements and how we can coexist in the same corridor together. that is our plant. we have received $800 million of the high-speed rail program money. we have five projects currently under construction with another of five coming in the next year. the im
by democrats and republicans alike this year after the shooting in colorado, more recently last week in oregon. if it is not gun control, then what about mental health and troubled youths who decide to do this? could congress discuss this issue a denture a more serious way? >> we need to ask those questions. we need to search for the answers. that is part of what we can do a in congress. we can hold the hearings and dig further and try to better understand exactly what happened and what drives individuals to take the lives of the innocents this way. it is very important we ask those questions, get the answers so we can prevent these types of situations from happening. >> "newsmakers" this sunday at 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> next, your calls and comments on "washington journal." than a discussion on the future of syria. a forum of the impact of the latino population in future elections. >> i wanted to explain how this totalitarianism happens. we do know the story of the cold war. we know the documents. we have seen the archives that describe relationships between stalin, ch
with louisiana to do that. there is a steady in oregon that looked at people on medicaid and not on medicaid, considered a gold standard study. it showed the care and well- being and the health outcomes for people receiving medicare coverage were far superior to those not having health care covered and were uninsured. there are lots of issues in louisiana that are challenging for anyone to tackle. the evidence around the country is that you can make medicaid work well for beneficiaries and improve health outcomes. the discretion around assigning the program and determining the delivery system, contracts with providers, those are positions that are state decisions. >> you mention native americans as a specific population. when we are switched to modified adjusted gross income, in medicaid when the they are exempt from class sharing entirely in the medicaid program. we disregard certain income available to them as members of a tribe. that gets changed under magi. they will become tax credit eligible rather than a medicaid eligible. >>" i do not think that is the case. i hope they will get a ch
oregon is correct. the house is not in order. thank you. the gentleman from texas may resume. mr. johnson: lastly, the bill directs g.a.o. to conduct a study to determine whether the medicare program should use smart card technology, an idea advanced by my colleagues, jim gerlach of pennsylvania and earl blumenauer of oregon to prevent waste, fraud and abuse in the medicare program. members should know this isn't the first time c.m.s. has been directed to act. starting in 2002, g.a.o. first called for ending the use of social security numbers on government documents. then in 2005, the fiscal year 2006, labor-hhs bill urged the secretary to accelerate planning for removing social security numbers and asked for a report. then in 2007, o.m.b. issued a directive to all federal agencies to develop plans for reducing the use of social security numbers. and then in 2008, my colleague, lloyd doggett, and i brought a bill to the floor to end the use of social security numbers on medicare cards. most recently, at an august, twelve, joint hearing, they talked about a lack of a serious plan to stop d
, a tool developed by the child and family center of the university of oregon that highlights parenting skills and preventing the progression of drug use among youth. as i close, we should remind ourselves of our good health is a gift. it is precious. it is fragile. it is particularly fragile for the kids. while we have made progress on a number of these issues, we need to redouble our efforts for prevention. we can all do more to help our kids enjoyed a fighting chance for health. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, dr. koh. i have had the fortunate opportunity to interact with dr. koh and his staff over a number of initiatives. currently, i am working with dr. volkoh and previously working with mr. kerlikowske who was confirmed as the director of the office of national drug control policy in the white house. indisposition he coordinates all aspects of federal drug control programs -- in this position he courted all aspects of federal drug control prog -- programs. he recently served for nine years as the chief of police for seattle washington where he left crime at its lowes
oregon. republican line. caller: there are so many issues to address here but i certainly wanted to talk to joshua specifically. i retired from the air force after 20 years and recently finished my master's degree. my thesis was on diagnosing and the affects of diagnosing on the economy. one of the things i discovered through my research, which i find remarkable -- my professors as well -- was that there were two types of social security. one that people pay into and one that people do not pay into. the one which is not paid into is the one that is consuming the majority of our resources regarding social security. as i was doing the research, my thesis, the question that came about -- i was seeing clients as an intern -- these people who were receiving benefits based on being 100% disabled. there was no clear, defining factor that said when a person was 100% disabled, or 40% disabled, as we have in the military. everyone is diagnosed with a mental disorder is considered 100% disabled and is entitled to 100% benefits. the question that should be raised is, why is this not being addressed?
beyond 9:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: thank you, mr. speaker. congress is here on new year's eve with the people they love. themselves, the special interests and the policies of the past. the overhyped fiscal cliff may well be upon us and we will find $600 billion of deficit reduction with tax increases and spending cuts, and then there will be the howls that we're doing it too abruptly from the same people that demand the same system of expiring cuts and sequestration in the first place. make no mistake, there will be some real damage. we'll be squeezing some people who deserve far better. then we'll be scrambling to find the -- refine budget reductions in a way that makes sense. in the hours, days, weeks ahead, we'll get a semi balanced small agreement. very likely, struggling throughout the new congress with budget bluster, especially in the house, moving from crisis to deadline to showdown. it's ironic because it doesn't need to be this hard. we could use the pressure and revenue from expiring temporary t
oregon, mr. defazio, for five minutes. mr. defazio: well, yesterday the republicans released a vague press release saying it constituted a counteroffer to the president's road map to avoid driving over the fiscal cliff. now, the republican plan purports to cut $1.3 trillion and raise $800 billion in new revenues. it did contain four specifics. four. cut medicare specific number one. $600 billion. cut medicaid, pays for nursing homes for seniors, of course. priority number two. three, cut the adequate cola for seniors on social security. even though 40% of seniors depend principally or totally upon social security and the cola already underestimated inflation particularly for medicare, essentials they need. cut that. not a driver of the deficit but, hey, cut that. one more specific. preserve the bush-era tax rates for income over $250,000. it's not a tax increase for everybody who earns over $250,000. it's only the income over $250,000 that would get additional taxes if the bush-era rates went away and the president's proposal was passed. but, no, they want to preserve -- totally pres
the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: thank you, mr. speaker. it's difficult to focus on the task at hand in the aftermath of a shooting rampage in my district yesterday. with at least 10,000 people in a shopping mall, a young man allegedly and some eyewitnesses with body armor and semi-automatic weapon discharged 60 shots or more. there were two people killed and a young 15-year-old girl seriously wounded. mr. speaker, one is haunted by these events. we had one in aurora, colorado, at the theater where there was 12 people killed, 60 wounded. six people killed at the seek temple this summer. we had an horrific episode earlier in my congressional career in springfield, oregon. it's hard to have meaningful conversations in a variety of subjects. i was going to deal with that problem with the fiscal cliff today, but gun violence is another area in america where it seems we can't have a discussion without delusional claims of overreach and taking away hunting rifles. congress won't even allow statistics on gun violence to be gathered, and we certainly
for every american. thank you. >> the chair now recognizes the chair person from oregon for five minutes. >> thank you for all of the witnesses for your testimony. i'm going to follow up on discussion we have already been having about education, especially s.t.e.m. education and the importance of educating the public about the benefits of the space program. there has been some testimony that begins to touch on this. you talk about how space programs have improved our lives from vaccinations research to weather satellites. you talk about how do we define the purpose and meaning behind exploration of space within a society that is not always see tangible benefits. you say and this will be especially challenging unless there is a clear rationale linking such efforts that can be supported in a bipartisan manner. there is some discussion about the skills gap and s.t.e.m. education and the role of nasa and promoting s.t.e.m. should be marked strategically articulated. what is the industry doing to convey to the public the benefits of space exploration? how can the contributions of our space pr
over the past few years. an elementary school, a shopping mall in oregon, a house of worship in wisconsin, a movie theater in colorado, countless streetcorners. any of these neighborhoods could be our own. we have to come together. we will have to take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this from happening regardless of politics. this weekend, michele and i are doing what i know every parent is doing, holding our children as close as we can and reminding them how much will love them. there are families in conn who cannot do that today. they need all of us right now. while nothing can take the place of a lost child or loved one, all of us can extend a hand to those in need to remind them that we are there for them, that we are praying for them, and the love they felt for those they lost not just in doris in their own memories but in their communities and their country. thank you and god bless you. >> john boehner sent his prayers and condolences to those in connecticut. there would be no weekly address a president obama could speak to all of those in this time of
and the people closed that gun show loophole by a vote of 70% to 30%. that same night in oregon, 60% to 40% system of americans will step up when their elected officials don't and vote for reasonable gun laws. we can't put every measure, we can't put every measure before a vote. we have to be able to count on our elected officials. to do that for us. as we are doing here today. it would be easy to be discoloneled, for me to be discurmed after 13 years of this activity. easy to be discouraged. but i can't be. because i have hope. because these people have hope also. that we can do something to change it. these people here before you because they refuse to be statistics. they want to be the story. the stories of ordinary americans who have been through -- they've been through hell and back. and they don't want it to happen to the rest of you. they're ordinary people who were thrown into an extraordinary tragedy. they didn't ask to be thrown into that. like so many others dan mentioned. it happens to so many people. we are not here to ask for your pity. we are asking to share our stories with
in oregon when i was going to the university of oregon, i had no background check. i bought that thing with a paper license and was in and out within 10 minutes. before i could get to the door, they tried to pitch me on getting a concealed carry and buying more ammunition. host: how much was the ak-47? caller: about $450. host: here is a comment from our facebook page -- if you want to continue this conversation on our facebook page, you can go to facebook.com/c-span. you will be able to join in on the conversation. do you think gun laws should be changed? eric? caller: can you hear me? i absolutely think they should be changed. i do not think there is any reason whatsoever for anyone to own an assault weapon. there is no function for them in sportsman life at all. the only reason is for people to feel macho. i own a couple of hunting rifles and a shotgun. host: front page of "the washington post" -- the nra is scheduled to hold a press conference at their headquarters about 20 miles outside of washington tomorrow. there are scheduled to hold a press conference tomorrow, and c-span cam
is on the phone from oregon. republican line. caller: there are so many issues to address here but i certainly wanted to talk to joshua was specifically. i retired from the air force after 20 years and recently finished my master's degree. my thesis was on diagnosing and the affects of diagnosing on the economy. one of the things i discovered through my research, which i find remarkable -- my professors as well -- was that there were two types of social security. one that people pay into and one that people do not pay into. the one which is not paid into is the one that is consuming the majority of our resources regarding social security. as i was doing the research, my thesis, the question that came about -- i was seeing clients as an intern -- these people who were receiving benefits based on being 100% disabled. there was no clear, defining factor that said when a person was 100% disabled, or 40% disabled, as we have in the military. everyone is diagnosed with a mental disorder is considered 100% disabled and is entitled to 100% benefits. the question that should be raised is, why is this n
towrntion connecticut, you a rohr a, colorado, oak creek, which is, which and portland, oregon. these were just fairly recently, mr. president. as president obama said last night, no one law can erase evil, no policy can prevent a determined madman from committing a senseless act of violence. but we need to accept the reality that we're not doing enough to protect our citizens. in the coming days and weeks we'll engage in a meaningful conversation and thoughtful debate about how to change laws in culture that allow this violence to continue to grow. we have no greater responsibility than keeping our most vulnerable and most precious resource -- our children -- safe. and every idea should be on the table as we discuss how best to mr. mcconnell: mr. president, want to start by extending my deepest sympathies to the families of the victims of friday's massacre and to the whole community and to thank the first responders and all those who are helping in the aftermath of this darkest of tragedies. three days after the horrors of newtown, we're all still reeling from what happened. anytime there
at good samaritan hospital in portland. i love oregon. where you live down there is just absolutely -- caller: we go without electricity a lot been very guest: thank you for calling. caller: i just wanted to say that president obama unfortunately -- i am a democrat and a hard in true believer in caring and living the words that were spoken by jesus and every other holy man about loving each other. he has given in eight times more to go along with the republican party that has said absolutely no to everythingi saw teh statistics -- everything. i saw the statistics of how much of the ultra wealthy would hav eto pay. it is in minuscule amount of money they are payicomplaining about. lots and lots of wealthy americans are denouncing their american citizenship so they do not have to pay any taxes in america. as far as these kids in sandy, my oldest daughter told me we are going to see lots more of these things unless kids are given a better future to hope for rather than being some rich person's slave. host: thank you for the call. guest: you are right. the rich, no matter what the tax l
-use planners, long, planners in my former hometown of portland, oregon, said a target to reduce single-family home ownership to 41% of the region, and it's currently 65% of the region. if that's less than tokyo. 45% of the residents of tokyo live in single-family homes. we have planners saying they want to force people out of their homes, put them in high- density apartments and condominiums and things like that. that's hurting the american dream. host: jim is joining us on the phone from lorraine, ohio. calleindependent line. caller: i disagree with what your guest is saying. yesterday you had on their house prices have dropped 30%, 60%, in many of our major cities. the mess was caused by mortgage companies and banks and wall street and aig. the government bailed them out. how you can sit there and say most of the problems are woodland restrictions -- are land restrictions with the mess we were in, it's ridiculous. guest: you only have to look in the data that are in my book or that you can download from a variety of web sites that shell housing prices have dropped tremendously in pla
are you in oregon? caller: out in the woods and the country, between the coast and the ocean. guest: i medical doctor and i did might in turn ship at good samaritan hospital in portland. i love oregon. where you live is absolutely -- caller: we go without electricity a lot. yesterday we had no electricity. thank you very much. i just wanted to say that president obama, unfortunately -- i am a democrat and a hard in true believer in caring and loving and living the words that were spoken by jesus and every other holy man about love each other. he has given in tons more than most of us wanted him to give in to go along with the republican party that has said absolutely no to everything they say they will not cooperate at all. i saw the statistics of how much extra money the wealthy would have to pay because their taxes would be raised. we're talking one or two%. it is a miniscule amounts of money they are complaining about it is the age-old problem called greedy. lots and lots of the wealthy americans are denouncing their american citizenship so they don't have to pay any taxes in americ
or a shopping mall in oregon or a temple in wisconsin or a movie theater in aurora or a street corner in the chicago, these neighborhoods are our neighborhoods, and these children are our children. we will have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this regardless of politics. this evening, michelle and i will do what i know every parent in america will do, which is hug our children a little tighter, and we will tell them that we love them, and we will remind each other how deeply we love one another, but there are families in connecticut who cannot do that tonight, and they need all of us right now. in the hard day to come, the community needs us to be at our best as americans, and i will do everything in my power as president to help because while nothing can fill the space of a lost child or a loved one, all of us can extend a hand to those in need to remind them that we are there for them, that we are praying for them, that the love they felt for those they lost endures not just in their memories but also in ours. may god bless the memory of th
: it's my pleasure to yield three minutes to the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from oregon is recognized for three meant. mr. blumenauer: thank you, mr. speaker. this defense authorization legislation is a missed opportunity. our friends would have us approve at a time when we are struggling with the long-term fiscal stability of the united states where it's set to pass a bill that authorizes funding of bills we approved in the budget control act. this is 20% above the cold war average, double what we had in 2001. even if somehow we went over that dreaded fiscal cliff and sequestration kicked in, it would only reduce spending to what it was in 2007, adjusted for inflation, when we were fighting two wars. it's a missed opportunity. i heard my friend from utah talk about avoiding any increase in fee in terms of health care. excuse me? we are looking at draconian impacts that some are suggesting for some of our society's most vulnerable, and here we haven't adjusted a fee since 1995. the department of defense is going to spend $50 billion on
and president of the progressive policy institute. we have bob packwood from oregon, the former chairman of the senate finance committee. we hope to get your thoughts. the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have about an hour to an hour and a half. it is amazing at how time flies by. so please jump in. i will direct the conversation as best i can. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this debate, and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path and incorporate changes in tax policy to get there. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table, and we like all your thoughts, we need some ideas. both sides need this to bridge this gap because right now we appear to be at a stalemate. i will turn it over to john podesta to get your thoughts. knowing that john has to leave, and the center for american progress has come up with ideas, and, john, maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those and your thoughts on this
a vaccine you could make ahead of time in anticipation of these unknown strains. host: oregon. republican line. richard. go ahead. caller: my question is i have never had the flu shot, and i went to my local pharmacy. i checked in to the possibility of getting the shot for the first time in my life, and i find out that most of the people that work there have the flu, and they have already had shots. i did not understand. i'm serious. these people are sick, they got the flu and they got the flu shot, and i have not had the flu since i was a kid. guest: once again, a lot of the colds that people get during the flu season is not influenza. the best way to protect yourself from the flu is a flu shot every year. host: off of twitter the question -- why is the flu vaccine less effective in the elderly than in children? dr. frieden, is that the case? guest: yes, particularly in people whose immune system are weaker. we wish it were effected equally in all populations but it is clear that young people with more robust immune systems respond better. for the elderly, particularly people that are co
as the election director in the state of oregon and the state of alaska. with that, i will hand off to john and i look forward to the panel. >> thank you. i'm very excited about this panel. i have told them that we want to keep things moving in the one hour we have been given, that we want to keep people awake because we know we're the only thing standing between them and cocktail hour. we are going to do a good job of discussing the current issues on voter registration and what the experiences of various panel members have been this year. i will give you that cliff notes on the bios of these four people. the first one is secretary ross miller from nevada. he was first elected in 2007 as the youngest secretary of state in nevada's history. he's currently the president of maps. he was honored by the aspen institute as of 24 rising stars in governments and he has successfully fought for campaign and election reforms in his state. nevada is one of the states that has been working with us and working with other states to form the electronic registration information center, an exciting new development
? let's go to dawn in eugene, oregon. caller code good morning. listen, the contribution thing is a way to be of service, as far as i'm concerned. host: by contribution you mean charitable contribution? caller: yes. it is something that i would want to keep. i mean, not keep, but i would be willing to contribute to that concern about taxes. my main concern is the mortgage deduction. how severe -- many of us have every dollar that we account for on the federal. if we did not have that, we would be up to 25%. this would be quite a severe blow if this were done in a cut and dried fashion. maybe they can do a tiered thing? that is the thing about taxes, a lot of people purchase property taxes, i am really for a federal sales tax. maybe some of us could keep the deductions that we are accustomed to or that we need, but maybe on a local level or federal level, i do not know, people have a fair share coming in. the burden is on the property owner. it is kind of crazy, you know? cities are projecting that in a couple of years they will be worse off now. whenever types of tax forms that we have,
given by democrats and republicans this year after the shooting in colorado and in oregon at the mall and in previous incidents. if it is not gun control, what about mental health and troubled youth could congress due to discuss this issue in a more serious way? >> we need to ask those questions. we need to search for the answers. that is part of what we can do in congress. members, rep. we can hold hearings and big brother and try to better understand what happened to and what drives individuals to take the lives of the innocents this way. it is important that we ask those questions, get answers so we can prevent these types of situations from happening. >> this sunday at 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> next, the ceo of bank of america in the form on feature homeownership in the u.s. in the fiscal cliff and tax filings and how the fiscal cliff can affect medicare payments to doctors. tomorrow, we will take your calls and offer a perspective on the reaction to the connecticut shoshooting. a look at how states are bracing for sequestration. advice to those preparing a 20
in oregon, a house of worship in wisconsin, a movie theater in colorado, countless street corners in places like chicago and philadelphia. any of these neighborhoods could be our own. we have to come together. will have to take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this from happening regardless of politics. this weekend, michelle and i are holding our children as close as we can and reminding them how much we love them. there are families in connecticut who cannot do that today, and they need all of us right now. all of us can extend a hand to those in need, to remind them that we're there for them, that we are praying for them, and that the love they felt for those they lost in doors in their communities and in their country. thank you and god bless you. host: the president's we can address -- weekend address. we want to tell you about what is coming up on tomorrow's edition of " "washington journal." we begin with a roundtable discussion. there will be talking about the latest news out of the fiscal cliff negotiations. we will continue our discussion regarding the fiscal cliff
areas to prepare for and respond to terrorist attacks. a large portion of the oregon populations in the u.s. -- of the urban population is in the u.s. are multinational, whether in washington d.c. -- like washington, d.c. and we need to know how to respond to terrorism. host: in this figure, we see some of the biggest states in red. california and new york, and then the color scheme goes down from their depending on how much money they've gotten parents why california -- they've gotten. why california and new york? is it because they are such big urban areas? guest: it is a combination of daud and also because of the world trade center bombing. it is a major terrorist target. in california, you have a large population centers. you also have one of the largest and most important ports in the long beach area. there is another program specifically designed to enhance port security. host: $98,000 was spent on an underwater robot in columbus, ohio. is it harder for urban areas outside of metropolitan areas to justify the grants and find ways to use them? are there hurdles in getting m
that just as after aroarow, just as after oregon, just as after columbine, we won't act. and that's not good enough. i'll tell you how i'm going to challenge myself. i'm going to imagine noah and jack, 6-year-olds who nobody really knew. i didn't know them. their parents didn't really know them. didn't know where they'd go to college, what they'd grow up to be, who they'd take to a prom. i'm going to imagine them standing right here. and that's not hard for me with a 10-year-old and a 13-year-old at home. looking up and asking, will you do it? thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back the balance of my time. mr. murphy: thank you, mr. speaker. may i inquire as to the time remaining? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has 33 minutes remaining. mr. murphy: thank you, mr. speaker. we've got a number of speakers so we'll try to give a minute and a half to as many as we can and i'd yield now 90 seconds to the gentlelady from colorado, ms. degette. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. degette: not again. we all said it to ourselves in the split second we heard it on friday. no
've seen examples time and time again, pearl river, tennessee, the new life church in oregon, the lady in texas, where people have stopped the killer either in mid may hem by having a gun of their own, either a gun that was in a parked car or a gun that was in their person. i'm not saying that's the solution for everything but declaring a gun-free zone doesn't mean that you have a gun-free violence. that gray principle -- brave principal who tried to stop him, i admired her courage but it wasn't going to stop matters. i'm not saying she could have stopped him but making sure everyone in that school was unarmed, obviously that didn't help here. host: so we should arm school officials? guest: well, the police chief of st. louis has said that we should put that on the table. i'm not saying we should arm police officials but let's at least say that just like pilots. you know, pilots can be armed. we had a long battle about that. should pilots be able to carry whens on a plane that's pressurized where you could do all kinds of damage to the plane's fuselage? and we agree that pilots should
that was discouraged in going to a school when into a mall. this was the oregon case. he pointed his gun at the shooter as he paused to reload and that stopped him. the guy shot himself. he went to a mall. the would-be killer decides a school is a high-risk proposition and he might go someplace else or not doing at all. host: 1 last caller. caller: i have heard different numbers to put police officers in schools. there is a police officer where i live at all of the schools. i live here in georgia. it is not a metropolitan area by no means. it is a small town. we have police officers at the school. we have 30 schools. i do not think it is costing the federal government a thing. we have not had anything happen. i believe somebody who is armed at the school with the proper training -- host: ok. guest: suppose you had more parents around. we had a shooter here in d.c. they were going to cancel a football game. i said why don't we have the dads just ring the field? a show of solidarity. we're here and you cannot walk in here. you can have volunteers haven't a presence in the school and i might have some eff
: we can get into more about those deals down the road. let's go to our republican line from oregon. caller: thank you for taking my call. to me, the fiscal cliff is just a small smokescreen. the fiscal cliff that is coming is obamacare. nobody is addressing obamacare. i had to find out friday that we will be taxed 2.3% on any device used in any medical field we go to. my husband is a doctor. he wrote out a prescription for us for january, and he said, i do not know how much this will cost you a of pocket because of obamacare. he even said, my husband is over 70, he did not know how much water he would be able to help him because of obamacare. this is just a smokescreen. when people find out that not only will we be taxed on medical devices, but even our debt bills will be going up because of our animals -- this thing is a joke. you liberals out there, you'll be hit just as hard as the republicans. as the tea party warn you that this will happen. host: let's give the guys at the chance to comment on health care law and its place in this debate. guest: it is not part of the fiscal cl
in my former hometown of portland, oregon, said a target to reduce single-family home ownership to 41% of the region, and it's currently 65% of the region. that's less than tokyo. 45% of the residents of tokyo live in single-family homes. we have planners saying they want to force people out of their homes, put them in high-density apartments and condominiums and things like that. that's hurting the american dream. host: jim is joining us on the phone from lorraine, ohio. independent line. caller: i disagree with what your guest is saying. yesterday you had on their house prices have dropped 30%, 60%, in many of our major cities. the mess was caused by mortgage companies and banks and wall street and aig. the government bailed them out. how you can sit there and say most of the problems are with land restrictions, with the mess we were in, it's ridiculous. guest: you only have to look in the data that are in my book or that you can download from a variety of web sites that shell housing prices have dropped tremendously in places like california and florida that have land use restricti
from the progressive policy institute. we have senator bob packwood from oregon, former chairman of the senate finance committee, part of the 1986 negotiations. and the other folks here have been part of the conversation. my only message to the new arrivals, please jump in whenever you see fit. we have an hour to an hour and a half. if you hear something you want to weigh in on, don't wait for me. we're talking now about the other very small issue in this issue and that is tax policy and how best to put the nation on a sustainable fiscal path. the question of revenue, how much, where to get it, the options on the table and would like your thoughts. as you heard from chairman bachus. they need ideas to bridge this gap because we appear to be at a stale mate. i turn it over to john to get your thoughts knowing he has to leave and the center for american progress has come out with some ideas and john maybe you would like to weigh in on some of those and your thoughts on this debate. >> peter, i think following up on this morning's session, clearly to have a balanced approach we need
overall quality of life here. that has gotten better over the years. host: kelvin from portland, oregon. caller: good morning. thank you for hosting this show. looking at the census for the future -- hello? host: we can hear you. caller: i am a fan that enjoys the various topics that you show. i agree with the folks debtor showing demographic data -- that are showing demographic data. my question to the guests this morning has to do with the impact of a single member district verses running at large and the correlation to how that will impact the voting patterns for the future. that's my question. guest: i have to punt on that specific question. we saw that in the presidential election. never saw a so much attention given to demographics. that had a lot to do with the outcome. it may have some impact and it is part of the voting rights act. that is being relooked at again. host: to find a baby boomer -- define a baby boomer. those baby boomers at are beyond the age of retirement. how many are moving into retirement age in the next five or 10 years? guest: i don't have that number with m
. as a nation, we have endured far too many tragedies -- the school in connecticut, the shopping mall in oregon, the house of worship in wisconsin, the movie theater in colorado, countless street corners in places like chicago and philadelphia. we have to come together, and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this from happening, regardless of politics. this weekend, michele and i are doing what i know every parent is doing, holding our children as close as we can and reminding them a much we love them. there are families in connecticut that cannot do that today. they need all of us right now, because while nothing can take the place of the lost child or a loved one, all of us can extend a hand to those in need to remind them that we are there for them and we are praying for them the love that they felt for those they lost in door's not only in their own memory, but also in their countries. thank you, and god bless you. >> flags, again, flying have staffed here in the nation's capital. reactions have come in worldwide with condolences from australia, great britain, thailand, t
of these tragedies in the last few years, an elementary school in newtown, a shopping mall in oregon, a house of worship in wisconsin, a movie theater in colorado, countless street corners in places like chicago and philadelphia. any of these neighborhoods could be our own. so we have to come together, and we have to take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this from happening. regardless of politics. this weekend, michelle and i are doing what i know every parent is doing, holding our children as close as we can and reminding them how much we love them. there are families in connecticut who cannot do that today, and they need all of us right now, because while nothing can take the place of a lost child or a loved one, all of us can extend a hand to those in need, to remind them that we are there for them, that we are praying for them, and that the love they felt for those they lost indoors not just in their memories but also in their communities -- for those they lost endures. thank you, and god bless you. >> tonight, we will take a look at some of the attributes to
continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: thank you, mr. speaker. the reality behind the fiscal cliff is that if we really get down to work, talking with one another, digging into the details, it really is not that hard. the nuclear arsenal is a prime example and something that doesn't get nearly the attention it deserves and is an illustration of why the fiscal sequestration level over the next 10 years for the department of defense, which would bring it down to 2007 spending levels adjusted for inflation, is really not that draconian. during the cold war, the united states spent on average $35 billion a year on its nuclear weapons complex. today, it spends an estimated $55 billion. the nuclear weapons budget is spread across the department of defense, department of energy, the department of homeland security, and the government doesn't publicly disclose how much it is, but the last year that the elements were aggregated together, it spent at least $52.4 billion, that's in 2008, according to the carnegie end
will be best for oregon, what are the things that are native to oklahoma and that will grow the best heat they have their and the lack of water. what will do best in vermont, virginia. let's encourage our natural environment because, one, it is a lot cheaper. and she was a penny pincher. [laughter] frugal is the nice word. but she wanted us to live up to the best that god gave us, and she believed that having those native plants on the highways would remind us of the beauty that god gave us. and it was a lot cheaper not to be planting roses out there or something that was not going to come up next year. so when you see those little signs about, forgive us for not mowing but we're waiting for the seeds to go in the ground, it is said the money. and it is wonderful. we now have a wonderful wildflower center that has been named after her. she finally led us to do it. she did not want it named after her. but the lady byrd wildflower center in austin. we're doing everything to raise money for it and we're goingand. to do a children's garden so we can start with the little children, teaching th
. without him, we would not be talking today. >> salem, oregon, republican line. you are on the air. caller: good morning. as a college student, and i have listened to every single caller, this is an embarrassing day for our country. i am a first-time job hunter, unemployed, a college student with loans, i am embarrassed and looking at this situation. my life is going to be turned upside down because of this. legislators need to stop bickering with these comments. they need to come together and do something like this. i am embarrassed because of not -- because none of my legislators will do anything about it. >> who are your representatives? caller: [indiscernible] it is embarrassing. it was a good conversation and i said -- is there any way that you couldn't speak on the floor to this issue? he said pc would heat would do. he basically lied to my face. even though he may not think that, he embarrassed me. >> he never spoke to the issue on the floor? caller: not that i am aware of. >> florida, hello. caller: i am going to read a quote from the speech, the 2008 democratic national convention
through this too many times whether it is an elementary in newtown or a shopping mall in oregon or a temple in wisconsin or a movie theater in aurora or a street in chicago. these neighborhoods are our nareds and these children are our children. we're going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this regardless of the politics. this evening michelle and i will do what every parent in america will do, we'll hug our children a little tighter and we'll remind them how much we love each other. there are families in connecticut that can't do that tonight and they need us right now. in the hard days to come that community needs us to to be at our best as americans. i will do everything in my power as president to help while nothing can fill the spiss of a lost child or loved one, all of us can extend a hand to those in need to remind them we are there for them. we are praying for them, the love they felt for those they lost endures not just in their memories but also in ours. may god bless the memory of the victims. and heal the broken heart
the supermarket in tucson, arizona, to a movie theater in aurora, colorado, a shopping mall in oregon, an elementary school in newtown, connecticut, to the streets of brooklyn, new york, why have we been so reluctant in protecting them? why have we let them -- left them unprotected, vulnerable to gun violence, death, and the terror that such actions inflict. who will speak for the people whose lives were cut short, struck down, maimed and traumatized for life? when will we realize that these incidents are not inevitable that we have the ability to prevent gun violence and an obligation to do everything in our power to make gun violence a thing of the past. the answer to these questions will define this generation of members of congress, our answers will determine the future of our civil society. americans have the right to demand answers from this congress. we have the authority to keep the guns away from the streets of our cities and towns. in the 11th congressional district which i represent in new york city, the new york city police department reported 274 victims from 226 incident
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